How to Automatically Start Shortcuts When You Open an App on iPhone or iPad 2022

This tutorial is about how shortcuts start automatically when you open an app on iPhone or iPad. We will do our best for you to understand this guide. I hope you will like this blog How to Automatically Start Shortcuts When You Open an App on iPhone or iPad. If your answer is yes, please share after reading this.

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You probably spend a lot of time on your iPhone or iPad, doing task after task in a variety of apps. Think about how much time you would save if you could automate these tasks or even combine them into a single action. You can do all of this and more with Apple’s Shortcuts app. With a variety of predefined actions, the Shortcuts app lets you create custom sequences or access a large gallery of existing shortcuts. After setting up a shortcut, tap on it and it will perform the assigned tasks.

Shortcut can be run on your iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch running iOS 12 or later, but you must be running iOS 13 and later on iPhone or iPadOS 13.1 and later on iPad to use the full functionality of the app. This includes integration with the Notes app in iOS 12.2, and recently a new automation feature that lets you choose actions to add to your shortcuts in a more user-friendly, step-by-step way. You can run a shortcut in several ways. Opening the Shortcuts app and tapping a shortcut on the home screen is the easiest option. You can also add a Shortcuts widget to your home screen to activate the streak faster or integrate the app with Siri’s wallet. Open the Shortcuts app and tap the Start button to get started.

Automation triggers

Automation triggers are divided into three categories: events, triggers, and parameters. Each trigger is also what I call “active” or “passive” in nature. An active trigger is one that results from a deliberate action by a user, such as connecting their iPhone to their CarPlay-enabled vehicle or touching an NFC tag. At some point, you deliberately did something with your iPhone to start the automation.

A passive trigger, like the time of day or arriving or leaving a location, is when you’re not actively doing something with or with your phone. Although you can leave a slot with your iPhone in your pocket, for example, your phone is passive at that time. Ironically, most automations with this type of trigger ultimately require your active consent to run. When its trigger is activated, you will receive a notification. By tapping on this notification, you will see a “Run” button. Tap it and your automation will work.

Events:

Time of day:

A passive trigger that fires at a certain time of day, possibly on a particular day or days of the week.

Alarm:

An active trigger that starts when you stop a designated alarm (or any other) on your iPhone or iPad.

Training with Apple Watch:

An active trigger that starts an automation when you start a workout on your Apple Watch.

To travel:

Arrival:

A passive trigger to reach a location.

To go out:

A passive trigger to leave a location.

Before travelling:

A passive trigger that can be configured to activate during or before your usual commute time to home or work.

CarPlay:z

An active trigger that starts your automation when successfully connected to CarPlay.

Settings:

  • Airplane Mode – An active trigger that starts your automation when you turn Airplane Mode on or off.
  • Wi-Fi: A passive trigger that activates when you join a particular Wi-Fi network, such as your home network.
  • Bluetooth: A passive trigger that activates when you connect to a specific Bluetooth accessory, such as AirPods.
  • Do Not Disturb – An active trigger that starts when you enable or disable Do Not Disturb.
  • Low Power Mode – An active trigger that fires when you enable or disable Low Power Mode.
  • NFC: An active trigger that starts your automation when you touch an NFC (Near Field Communication) tag or tag.
  • Open app – An active trigger that starts your automation when you open an app.

iOS 14 adds several new activation options:

  • Sleep: A passive trigger that can be activated when the relaxation process begins, when bedtime begins, or when you wake up with the new sleep features in iOS 14.
  • Email: A passive trigger that fires when you receive an email that meets certain parameters, such as sender, subject, or the account you received it on.
  • Messages – Like the email trigger, but for SMS and iMessages.
  • Battery Level: A passive trigger that fires an automation when your iPhone’s battery level equals, drops, or exceeds a threshold you set.
  • Charger: An active trigger that starts an automation when you connect or disconnect your iPhone from a charger.

How to Create a Shortcut Automation

If you’ve already created your own shortcuts, creating an automation isn’t that different. With the exception of the beginning, when you choose your trigger, creating an automation is exactly like creating a shortcut, and an automation can do anything a standard shortcut can do.

As an example, here we will build a simple automation that works with an NFC tag. An NFC tag or tag is usually a small object or tag with an embedded digital signature that your iPhone recognizes when you bring it near a tag. In the case of shortcut automation, your iPhone reads information that identifies the particular tag or label and then performs an action based on the tag it reads. In short, you set up your automation by scanning a particular NFC tag, then tapping your iPhone on that tag, and your automation runs.

NFC works with iPhone X or later.

Since we’re using NFC, the start of the instructions will be pretty specific to this, but setting up all the triggers is pretty self-explanatory once you get started.

  • Open Shortcuts on your iPhone.
  • Tap the Automation tab.
  • If you already have another automation, press the + button.
  • Tap Create Personal Automation.
  • Tap the trigger you want to use. In this example, we will touch NFC.
  • Tap Scan on the NFC tag.
  • Scan your NFC tag with your iPhone.
  • Assign a name to your NFC tag.
  • Press OK. After that, the instructions generally apply to all automations.
  • Press Next.
  • Tap Add action.
  • Tap one of the options presented to you, such as apps, bookmarks, location, a suggestion, or find the action you want to use.
  • Tap the action you want to add to your automation.
  • Touch a blue setting to change it.
  • Select an option for your setting.
  • Tap Show more if available.
  • Touch any setting or button to change them.
  • Tap the + button if you want to continue adding actions to your shortcut.
  • Tap Next when you’re done adding actions.
  • Tap the Ask Before Running switch (if available) to the gray “off” position if you want this automation to run without any further input once you trigger it.
  • Touch Don’t ask if touched to turn off.
  • Tap Done.

Final Words: How to Automatically Start Shortcuts When You Open an App on iPhone or iPad

Hope you understand this article How to Automatically Start Shortcuts When You Open an App on iPhone or iPad, if your answer is no, you can ask anything via the contact forum section linked to this article. And if your answer is yes, share this article with your family and friends.

Jennifer C. Burleigh